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Nursing Certification types:

Nursing Certification types: ACNP - ANP - FNP - GNP - PNP - PMHNP

 


Nurse Practitioner Certifications

Nurse Practitioner candidates must meet all of the following basic eligibility requirements. At time of application, the candidate must:

  1. Hold a currently active, unrestricted professional license in the United States or its territories;
  2. Hold a master's or higher degree in nursing;
  3. Have completed formal training in the same specialty area of practice in which they are applying for certification through a master's program or formal post-graduate master's program in nursing;
  4. Have graduated from a program offered by an accredited institution granting graduate-level academic credit for all course work that includes both didactic and clinical components, and a minimum of 500 hours of supervised clinical practice in the specialty area and role.

ACNP

The Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (ACNP) is a registered nurse with a graduate degree in nursing who is prepared to manage the health care of acutely ill patients at an advanced level. ACNPs use a collaborative model in their practice to provide direct services to acutely or critically ill adult patients in a variety of settings. The ACNP's advanced education and practice skills, along with diagnostic reasoning and advanced therapeutic interventions experience, are the key elements to provide quality care to their patients. The ACNP also uses skills in consultation, collaboration, and systems management to provide effective restorative care. The practice includes independent and interdependent decision making and the ACNP is directly accountable for clinical judgments.

ANP

The Adult Nurse Practitioner (ANP) is a registered nurse with a graduate degree in nursing who provides a full range of adult health care services at an advanced level. This practice includes independent and interdependent decision making and the ANP is directly accountable for clinical judgments. Graduate preparation expands the ANP's role to include participation in and use of research, development and implementation of health policy, leadership, education, case management, and consultation.

FNP

The Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) is a registered nurse with a graduate degree in nursing who provides individuals of all ages and families a full range of health care services at an advanced level. This practice includes independent and interdependent decision making and the FNP is directly accountable for clinical judgments. Graduate preparation expands the FNP's role to include participation in and use of research development and implementation of health policy, leadership, education, case management, and consultation.

GNP

The Gerontological Nurse Practitioner (GNP) is an expert in providing health care to older adults in a variety of settings, practicing independently and collaboratively with other health care professionals. In this role, the GNP works to maximize patients' functional abilities. Specifically the GNP promotes, maintains, and restores health, prevents or minimizes disabilities, and promotes death with dignity. The GNP engages in advanced practice, case management, education, consultation, research, administration, and advocacy for older adults.

PNP

The Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) is a registered nurse (RN) prepared at the graduate level who provides primary and specialty care for children from birth through 21 years of age. The PNP provides direct and indirect health care for both individual children and groups of children in the areas of health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration. These services are provided largely within family and developmental contexts, and are directed to children who are essentially well or those who have acute illnesses, chronic diseases, and disabilities. The PNP's practice builds on previously acquired nursing knowledge and includes client advocacy; coordination of care; and collaboration with health care, school, and community professionals. The PNP serves a leadership role, addressing health care trends, professional issues, role development, and research.

PMHNP

The Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP) is a registered nurse with a graduate degree in nursing who is prepared to administer advanced primary mental health care throughout a patients life, in accordance with ANAs scope and standards of psychiatric and mental health nursing. The PMHNPs practice includes independent and interdependent decision making and is directly accountable for clinical judgments. The PMHNPs role includes comprehensive physical assessment, diagnosis, and medication management, in addition to psychotherapeutic interventions. Graduate preparation allows the PMHNP to expand into the use of research, development and implementation of health policy, leadership, education, case management, and consultation in his or her practice.

Specific Eligibility Requirements

  1. Have graduated from of an accredited masters or post-masters program prepared to practice as either an Adult Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP), an Adult Advanced Practice Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse, a Family Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, or a Family Advanced Practice Psychiatric and Mental Health Nurse, which includes:
    • Advanced health assessment to include both physical and mental health (pediatric and adolescent physical and mental health assessment is required for the PMHNP-Family exam)
    • Pathophysiology (or neurophysiology/biophysiology)
    • Pharmacology or psychopharmacology*
    • Diagnosis and medication management of psychiatric illness (clinical practicum); and
  2. Clinical training at the graduate or post-graduate level in at least two psychotherapeutic treatment modalities.

*Pharmacology preferred; both Pharmacology and Psychopharmacology are ideal, however Psychopharmacology alone is acceptable. All PMHNP candidates are expected to have a broad understanding of basic pharmacologic principles, along with a strong background in psychopharmacological agents. An understanding of the major drug categories and drugs, the drug's purpose, its specific actions, and how drugs interact and affect psychiatric and mental health problems is required. Please note: prescriptive authority may require a general pharmacology course depending on the state in which you are licensed. ANCC recommends that you contact your appropriate state board of nursing for more information.

 

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